Crime and Punishment (version 2)


Read by Expatriate

(4.7 stars; 547 reviews)

"Crime and Punishment" is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing. "Crime and Punishment" focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits this murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things, and even have the right to do them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose. Much of the suspense of the novel is psychological, as the reader agonizes over Raskolnikov's efforts to evade justice for his crime. Much of it is also moral, as the question of whether or not Raskolnikov himself can find redemption as a human being leads to a surprising culmination. - Summary by Wikipedia (edited by Expatriate) (19 hr 52 min)

Chapters

Preface 5:39 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 01 19:30 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 02a 20:08 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 02b 21:25 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 03 30:15 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 04 29:05 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 05 24:04 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 06 28:35 Read by Expatriate
Part I, Chapter 07 26:40 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 01a 17:03 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 01b 21:10 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 02 23:32 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 03 29:51 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 04 22:43 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 05 25:57 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 06a 22:42 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 06b 22:59 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 07a 20:40 Read by Expatriate
Part II, Chapter 07b 20:10 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 01 30:34 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 02 25:41 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 03 29:57 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 04 25:30 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 05a 20:17 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 05b 22:42 Read by Expatriate
Part III, Chapter 06 25:21 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 01 27:59 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 02 27:13 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 03 17:52 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 04a 16:28 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 04b 20:54 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 05a 21:58 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 05b 19:43 Read by Expatriate
Part IV, Chapter 06 16:12 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 01a 18:36 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 01b 18:13 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 02 30:53 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 03 33:37 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 04a 17:27 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 04b 19:41 Read by Expatriate
Part V, Chapter 05 28:47 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 01 22:04 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 02 31:23 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 03 21:28 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 04 25:39 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 05 31:20 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 06 31:40 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 07 20:36 Read by Expatriate
Part VI, Chapter 08 22:38 Read by Expatriate
Epilogue, Chapter 01 18:08 Read by Expatriate
Epilogue, Chapter 02 19:59 Read by Expatriate

Reviews

Definitely the best book I've encountered


(5 stars)

Fabolous. the english is incredible. the tale is well cradted. i would give it a 6 star if i could.

incredible!


(5 stars)

A deep and visceral novel which speaks volumes of our humanity. The Narrator was perfect. Thank you for your time!!

Brilliant book that is read exceptionally well


(5 stars)

The reader has a very clear and consistent tone of voice and appears to have a good understanding of the material as he reads. Emphasis, timing, and pace make this a very enjoyable book to hear for long road trips. The actual story itself is a masterpice btw. Kudos to Librivox for sharing all this fantastic literature!

👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻


(5 stars)

To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's.

Unexpectedly brilliant


(5 stars)

I must admit before I started reading this I thought I'd give up after a few chapters....I just thought it will be dark, depressing, philosophical, moral,heavily intellectual...and it is all those things but in an absolutely brilliant way...its a riveting read in a way that I just wasn't expecting and it really gets inside your head...on top of that there's a great story and as Dostoyevsky introduces more characters the book becomes more interesting...the reader was brilliant I had tried a different version before but this reader really suits the main character...give it a go and stick with it...I'm converted and will definitely read more of Dostoyevsky


(5 stars)

this reader is a beast. pronounces Russian well, as well as great inflection in his reading. amazing job! oh yea, the book is also great. if you found ur way here to read this, your already gonna read it n like it, bit the reader makes this version even more enjoyable


(5 stars)

Brilliant writing . I could not stop listening.

Marathon effort


(4 stars)

The first thing I want to say about this book is that it's long. Longer than I expected. it's such a classic on many 'Must read before you die' lists that I somehow felt I had to complete it, but it was a struggle. Dostoyevsky seemed to go over the crime from every possible angle with Roskolnikov in protracted often repetitive discussions with his sister, his girlfriend his other friends and lawyers and police dancing around what he thought about crime in general and teasing out from his discussions what were others views of a theoretical situation similar to his, trying to come to a satisfactory conclusion to justify his actions in his own mind. It was certainly a marathon effort by the reader 'an expatriate from Bangor Maine' who sounded like David Schwimmer? And did an excellent job to plough through with barely any errors. I have read many Russian authors this way and find descriptions of life in 19th C Russia fascinating. Might try Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago next as I loved the movie.