Letters of a Woman Homesteader


Read by Lynne Carroll

(4.8 stars; 138 reviews)

The writer of the following letters is a young woman who lost her husband in a railroad accident and went to Denver to seek support for herself and her two-year-old daughter, Jerrine. Turning her hand to the nearest work, she went out by the day as house-cleaner and laundress. Later, seeking to better herself, she accepted employment as a housekeeper for a well-to-do Scotch cattle-man, Mr. Stewart, who had taken up a quarter-section in Wyoming. The letters, written through several years to a former employer in Denver, tell the story of her new life in the new country. They are genuine letters, and are printed as written, except for occasional omissions and the alteration of some of the names. (Publishers’ Note, May 1914) (5 hr 19 min)

Chapters

01 - Preface and Chapter 1 5:15 Read by Lynne Carroll
02 - Chapter 2 9:06 Read by Lynne Carroll
03 - Chapter 3 8:42 Read by Lynne Carroll
04 - Chapter 4 25:06 Read by Lynne Carroll
05 - Chapter 5 9:59 Read by Lynne Carroll
06 - Chapter 6 6:23 Read by Lynne Carroll
07 - Chapter 7 4:23 Read by Lynne Carroll
08 - Chapter 8 14:40 Read by Lynne Carroll
09 - Chapter 9 3:48 Read by Lynne Carroll
10 - Chapter 10 21:25 Read by Lynne Carroll
11 - Chapter 11 19:56 Read by Lynne Carroll
12 - Chapter 12 18:55 Read by Lynne Carroll
13 - Chapter 13 4:40 Read by Lynne Carroll
14 - Chapter 14 6:22 Read by Lynne Carroll
15 - Chapter 15 16:38 Read by Lynne Carroll
16 - Chapter 16 25:55 Read by Lynne Carroll
17 - Chapter 17 4:02 Read by Lynne Carroll
18 - Chapter 18 10:45 Read by Lynne Carroll
19 - Chapter 19 24:20 Read by Lynne Carroll
20 - Chapter 20 4:56 Read by Lynne Carroll
21 - Chapter 21 2:38 Read by Lynne Carroll
22 - Chapter 22 5:06 Read by Lynne Carroll
23 - Chapter 23 5:29 Read by Lynne Carroll
24 - Chapter 24 30:21 Read by Lynne Carroll
25 - Chapter 25 25:51 Read by Lynne Carroll
26 - Chapter 26 4:59 Read by Lynne Carroll

Reviews

Letters of a Woman Homesteader


(5 stars)

Wonderful! Both the author AND the reader deserve real recognition. The author because of her courage and wit; the reader, because her characterization was so believable it made the author sound as if she was writing her amazing letters just to you. Thank you so much.

Great stories and real life


(5 stars)

My great-grandmother moved with her family to West Colorado/NW Kansas in 1912, she's old enough to be responsible for keeping up the back of father 22 horses. They lived in a shodsod house set into a hill. I have a photo of she and her siblings sitting on top, dangling their legs. I was lucky enough to know her and even interviewed her and her youngest sister for a college class back in the 1980s. These stories brought so many things to mind...the k opted hands in particular, courtesy of an adulthood od hard work and milking twice a day. She lived on farms and ranches her whole life, and would run against the young girls and fast horses in riding a barrel race for the local roders...well into her 70s. Id like to think the author lived out her live in a similar way, surrounded by loving family, and active and alert most all of her days. Family, fun, and faith were necessary for those lives. O viously I enjoyed the stories, such clear descriptions of the high plains and mountains. Her characters.

Very enjoyable


(5 stars)

Very enjoyable book of real life letters by a woman homesteader in the American West, in the early years of the 1900's. The reader did a lovely job and reads very clearly. In response to the comments of the reviewer below, the writer's maiden name was Elinore Pruitt - He first husband's last name was Rupert; her second husbands last name was Stewart. In the letters, she sometimes signed herself as Elinore Rupert, Elinore Rupert Stewart, Elinore Stewart, and also Elinore Pruitt Stewart. This was not a mistake on the reader's or the proof-listener's part, but how it was actually written.

A very enjoyable book and reader


(5 stars)

This is a fun book with funny and touching anecdotes within the letters. The author can tell a story very well through her letters. Wyoming should use this as promotional material! The reader did a great job. She has a slight southern accent (to my ears, anyway), which fit well, since the author was originally from the South. Very good reading, and a quality recording. DISCLAIMER: The author is a Southern woman from the early 1900's. She therefore uses terms for certain minorities (acceptable in her time period) that are offensive today.

irresistible


(5 stars)

Elinore’s story is energizing and compelling. Her “lack” of education and immense, daily gratitude for what a modern would casually assume, grant the listener a perspective that’s worth keeping. She does speak in bigoted terms towards black Americans which is also a lesson in itself about how much has changed since the early 20th century. Beyond that, I was very sorry to reach the end of her letters. Her legacy is worth remembering. Many thanks to a well-voiced story as well! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Wonderful reading


(5 stars)

Such a joy to listen to the letters read as if to me alone. I feel I would like to write to Eleanor but of course she is long passed away. What a life, much fuller than what we live today. The letters were read so beautifully and added to the pleasure of the news within. Thank you for volunteering it was a joy to listen.

Great story!


(5 stars)

I so enjoyed this book! I could almost feel the campfire, smell the pines, hear the creeks and see the stars - I felt like I was there! I have such respect for this woman who felt blessed in spite of any hardships she experienced. She seemed to get so much joy out of life… Great job by the reader – she really drew me in.


(5 stars)

What a delightful book! This woman goes on about her lack of education and literacy and her descriptions expose her humility! I've been to Wyoming in 1910 thanks to her letters! I'm only sorry I can never meet her. What a women! The narration was as delightful as the writing. You'll not be disappointed!!