The Story of Avis


Read by Elizabeth Klett

(4.2 stars; 149 reviews)

Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's 1877 novel is set in a New England college town, and focuses on Avis Dobell, a professor's daughter. Avis is a talented painter, and bucks against the constraints placed on women in the 19th century. She wants to pursue a career as an artist and rejects marriage and motherhood, until she meets the charismatic young professor Philip Ostrander. Phelps's novel is a beautifully-written examination of the conflicts between marriage and career for women that is still relevant today. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett) (10 hr 25 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1 21:22 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 2 20:45 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 3 24:15 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 4 26:40 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 5 29:26 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 6 34:26 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 7 24:48 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 8 35:26 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 9 36:52 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 10 18:29 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 11 34:24 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 12 12:01 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 13 25:48 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 14 23:50 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 15 21:34 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 16 34:17 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 17 23:15 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 18 11:07 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 19 34:06 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 20 25:16 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 21 20:12 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 22 17:31 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 23 25:12 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 24 22:22 Read by Elizabeth Klett
Chapter 25 21:39 Read by Elizabeth Klett

Reviews

great reader, mediocre book


(2.5 stars)

As usual, Elizabeth Klett's reading is stellar. The book, however, is an exploration of the complexity of the marriage relationship that falls heavily on the side of "marriage is a prison and a relinquishment of dreams for women", combined with the attitude that men are pretty weak at their core. Maybe I've just been getting too much of a steady diet of those subjects but I found the book to be progressively more annoying with every chapter. I will conceed that the complexity of competing emotions was explored in an interesting manner but in the end it did not make up for the annoying "women are perfect, men are schlups" theme.

Warning - very heavy subjects, NOT light reading


(1.5 stars)

Spoilers included. - Genuinely love Elizabeth Klett’s narration. I was also enjoying the book a lot before the gut wrenching death of a child. I generally turn to historic fiction like this when I just need a light little thing to float me through a commute or silly data entry task at my job. So I was not prepared for how horribly sad this book would leave me.

A sad story that's well written and read


(4 stars)

What a good story and read beautifully. I was amazed at how little situations have changed from the time it was written. Women sacrifice a lot for their families and often lose themselves in the process.

Heartbreaking...


(3.5 stars)

Such a sad book. But I really liked the style and of course Elizabeth Klett's reading is always great!


(3 stars)

Wonderful narration as always! I did find the story a bit unrealistically negative and depressing but well written.

A very introspective and imaginative story.


(3 stars)


(4 stars)

I greatly enjoyed the unique storyline which I felt was well written. Although not action packed, this rather introspective story progressed well. Detail was spent on particular scenes, then the author proceeded to the point without insulting the reader's imagination by reporting every word of her well developed characters. At 25 chapters of about that many minutes, it's a rather short story. Enjoy!

Nice tale, but long


(4 stars)

i agree with an earlier reviewer that it seemed the rather interesting storyline seemed to long. The stresses of seeking a career in a time where having children often deferred such a goal. However it is the love children that strengthens her when problems come.